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The Millennial Minute

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These days, complaining about millennials is all the rage. From thinking we live off mom and dad’s cash flow and find it impossible to maintain a career or bank account, to the idea that we’re plagued with the “everyone gets a trophy” syndrome – the chatter around my generation has been far from positive and is often misinformed.

The term “millennial” refers to individuals born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s, though specific start and end dates aren’t set in stone. This group of 20-somethings was born after Gen-X (1960 -1980), and is also commonly referred to as Gen-Y. If you’re having a hard time finding where your Gen-whatever heart truly belongs, turn to Buzzfeed for comfort.

Just take a look at a few of these scathing write-ups: CBS News, TIME, USA Today, LinkedIn. My personal favorite snippet: “Gen-Y wants to look like a winner more than they want to be a winner.”

Ouch.

But what about the millennials who are crushing it in the workforce by creating and capitalizing on some of the most innovative technologies we’ve ever seen and making a real impact on the world?

The list goes on for days, but here are just a few:

  • Mark Zuckerberg, 30, co-founder of Facebook
  • Elizabeth Holmes, 30, engineer and founder of the revolutionary biotech startup, Theranos. Oh, and she is the world’s youngest female billionaire, if you’re keeping score.
  • Lena Dunham, 28, director/producer/writer/actress on a hit HBO show and an award-winning filmmaker and author
  • Kevin Systrom, 27, co-founder and CEO of Instagram
  • Pete Cashmore, 29, CEO and founder of the popular blog Mashable

Crushing it, indeed.

Carping about millennials is getting older and more tired than the Maury Povich show. I think a turning of the tides is in order and should start sooner than later…because this generation has Full House reruns to catch up on.

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Rachel is the Social Marketing and Public Relations Manager at the DeBerry Group. She brings a smart, fresh perspective to every project she touches, and has developed a keen sense of how to use social and digital tactics to enhance traditional PR efforts. From event management and coordination to media relations and message development, Rachel works with clients in a variety of arenas including government, education, retail, performing arts, utilities and property development.